Paleocene

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(Archosauromorphs)
 
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Many Paleocene mammals seem to have developed in northern Asia and migrated from there to the rest of Asia, to Europe and to North America, these made up the typical Laurasian fauna of the time.  The Paleocene inhabitants of the scattered continents of Gondwana are only poorly known, if at all.
Many Paleocene mammals seem to have developed in northern Asia and migrated from there to the rest of Asia, to Europe and to North America, these made up the typical Laurasian fauna of the time.  The Paleocene inhabitants of the scattered continents of Gondwana are only poorly known, if at all.
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According to (Gheerbrant ''et al.'' 2009), [[Proboscidae]] appeared around the Middle Paleocene, with the [[Genus]] ''Eritherium'' representing a transition between basal Afrotherians & modern orders. The Proboscideans appear just after the K-T extinction event. 55 My earlier than previously thought. Although, ''Eritherium'' is still ''extremely'' primitive.
====Archosauromorphs====
====Archosauromorphs====
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* [http://seaborg.nmu.edu/earth/Paleocen.html The Paleocene] - short intro
* [http://seaborg.nmu.edu/earth/Paleocen.html The Paleocene] - short intro
* [http://www.nceas.ucsb.edu/~alroy/Paleocene.html The Fossil Record of North American Mammals: Evidence for a Paleocene Evolutionary Radiation] - John Alroy
* [http://www.nceas.ucsb.edu/~alroy/Paleocene.html The Fossil Record of North American Mammals: Evidence for a Paleocene Evolutionary Radiation] - John Alroy
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== References ==
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* Paleocene emergence of elephant relatives & the rapid radiation of African Ungulates. Gheerbrant E, PNAS 2009, Jun 30th
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Latest revision as of 19:11, 7 December 2013

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